One Card Becomes Two: Wednesday, 30th November, 1977

We awoke at half past six to another sunny, warm morning and by eleven o’clock — really ten, as we are under daylight saving — it was already twenty-seven degrees Celsius. Tiki had had a further sleepless night due to the severe pain she has been experiencing in her left shoulder and arm since last Monday. It really must be sore, for she woke me several times during the night!

Tiki washed last night’s dishes and at a quarter to eight she received a telephone call from “Brutus”, as he was about to depart from Central Railway Station bound for Melbourne. He told her that he had left some garbage that included eggshells, in his unit and asked that if we happen to be over that way would we dispose of it for him.

We endured a long wait for Tiki to see her general practitioner and, as she suspected she has to have her left shoulder X-rayed. We arrived home at five minutes to twelve, just one minute before Bill Collins introduced the film, “Three’s A Crowd”. In this offering, from 1969, Larry “I Dream Of Jeannie” Hagman plays a chap who is married to two women. Norman Fell is cast as the liftman who assists him in his endeavours to keep the two women (played by Jessica Walter and E.J. Peaker) apart.

Tiki tore an old Christmas card in half in order to make another one. I hadn’t seen such a thing done before! The ‘new’ card is intended for an elderly friend of the family.

Having done this, it was time for her to ring the radiologists’. She was surprised to receive an appointment for a quarter past two. I drove her to the building that bears the name of ‘Wyoming’, which is located near Caringbah’s railway station. I sat in the waiting room while a gentleman, who appeared to be about six feet five inches tall, with fair hair and glasses, took X-rays of her left arm and shoulder.

In the meantime a young surfer, sporting a moustache of bum-fluff, wandered out attired in a smock of light blue. It displayed his bare back as well as his swimming costume, which was adorned in stars and stripes. No sooner had he appeared, than he was verbally dispatched back to his cubicle.

It transpired that the radiologist had overestimated the size of Tiki’s small shoulder and this had resulted in the initial X-rays being out of focus and, therefore, having to be retaken. I wrote out a cheque to the amount of forty-three dollars and ten cents and then accompanied Tiki to the third floor of Waltons to claim on it, in addition to this morning’s bill of eight dollars and seventy cents which had paid for her consultation to see her doctor.

We each enjoyed a glass of icy pineapple juice at the far table of the milk bar at the top of the stairs that lead from the Kingsway to the railway station. Sixty cents the poorer, I drove home by ten past three having not failed to notice the queer mushroom-shaped cloud during our short journey.

I watched the remainder of “The Mod Squad”, which concluded at four o’clock. Today’s edition centred upon a revolt at an educational institution and how the siege that ensued became right out of hand. Fortunately, Pete and Link, the male members of the Squad — played respectively by Michael Cole and Clarence Williams III — were on hand to bring the situation under control.

The ominous thunderclouds had made it so dark that, shortly after four, I was writing my diary — which has come to consume more and more of my time — with the light on.

We left for Tiki’s parents’ to give “Nan”, who is ninety years of age, her Christmas present. It consisted of stockings, ‘4711’ perfume and ‘4711’ refresher towels. In return she presented us with a cover for toilet rolls. It is in the form of a doll dressed in a flowing yellow dress, and was crocheted by her.

“Mum” insisted that we stay to dinner. “Dad” had elastoplast and six individual sticking plasters on cuts which were inflicted to his left shin when he rolled his rideable mower on the hilly front lawn, at the weekend. His mother experienced her second fall within a week, at 3.00 a.m. today, this time in the toilet of her home.

According to Channel Seven’s ‘News’ this evening, read by Roger Climpson, Terry Page, a bookmaker who is based here in Sydney, has been losing heavily over the past eighteen months and was allegedly near collapse after the first four races last Saturday were won by favourites or near favourites. He, also allegedly, had to stand himself down from fielding at today’s races as a consequence.

Tiki’s sister, Wendy, washed the dishes and after “Willesee” we departed, in the rain, to drive home. This evening’s edition of the programme, which is based upon current matters, featured the Adelaidian boy, Anthony Nolan, who at the age of six, appears to be losing his will to live in his fight against a disease of his bone marrow. Debby Boone — Pat’s daughter of twenty-one years — who is in Sydney to appear in John Denver’s TV Special, after her first single, “You Light Up My Life”, spent eight weeks atop the American chart, was also interviewed.

The last half of “Cousteau’s: The Sleeping Sharks Of Yucatan” was viewed from eight o’clock, followed, at half past the hour on Channel Seven, by a programme of the series, “Hunter”, which features James Franciscus, Linda Evans and the veteran actor, Ralph Bellamy. Tiki fell asleep on the floor with a pillow beneath her sore left shoulder.

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